HackTheHearst Mentors


Technical Mentors

AMY WIELICZKA

Role: Web applications programmer
Organization: Research IT (UC Berkeley)
Skills/Specialties: Front-end web development - HTML, CSS (Sass, Less, several rapid prototyping and grid based CSS frameworks such as Bootstrap, OOCSS), JavaScript (jQuery, some Backbone.js, some Meteor), Django, Python. Version control with git. Responsive design and UI/UX design experience. Digital imaging and layout and wireframe design with the Adobe Suite. Documentation and communications.
Projects: CollectionSpace, the UC Libraries Digital Collection (project wikiuser guide)
GitHub: amywieliczka
Twitter: @amywieliczka
Email: amywieliczka@berkeley.edu
Bio: After graduating from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute's Computer Science program, I moved out to the Bay Area and started working with Brick Design producing beautifully designed marketing websites and custom content management systems in a fast-paced environment with a focus on responsive design (linesballet.orgtjeg.com). In late 2011 I joined the Research Information Technology group at UC Berkeley working on the collection management system CollectionSpace. Over the course of the past year, I've been working with the California Digital Library on a custom digital asset management system and a publicly accessible interface to provide access to digital content within the UC Libraries. Outside of work, I practice, perform, and teach prop-based dance usually involving playing with fire, and I build warehouse community spaces for artists. In my free time, I'm an avid reader and hiker. 


ANNE WOOTTON

Role: Co-founder
Organization: Pop Up Archive
Skills/Specialties: Oral history, audio search via the Pop Up Archive API.
Projects: Pop Up Archive is building a public repository of oral history and public media from around the world, including historic audio from UC Berkeley.
GitHub: annewootton
Twitter: @annewootton
Email: edison@popuparchive.org
Bio: Bailey Smith and I started Pop Up Archive in the Master's program at the Berkeley I School, looking for a way to help radio producers and oral history archivists better preserve and create access to significant digital audio. We've been working with the Public Radio Exchange since 2013 on popuparchive.org, a platform for finding and preserving archival audio, including automatic transcription and keyword tagging. Partners include The Kitchen Sisters, the Pacifica Radio Archives, and WFMT-Chicago's Complete Studs Terkel Digital Archive.


ARON ROBERTS

Role: Application Programmer
Organization: Research IT (UC Berkeley)
Skills / Specialties: IT generalist skills, ranging from tech support and tech writing to marketing and training. Server-side programming experience in Java. Modest experience with ad hoc scripting in Perl/Python/Ruby and Linux shell scripts, SQL, VMs (Vagrant), installer building, configuration management tools (Puppet), team-oriented tools (version control, issue tracking, continuous integration), and REST API design and access. I have relatively light Web front-end experience (HTML/CSS/Javascript) and no mobile app development experience, however. Finally, I’m a Library School grad, and can often rapidly find potential approaches or solutions to IT problems via online searching.
Projects: CollectionSpace
GitHub: aronr
Twitter: @aronro
Email: aron@socrates.berkeley.edu
Bio: I’ve worked across a variety of IT roles at Cal for over 28 years. I have some reasonable understanding of the challenges many consumers of information services face. Outside work, I’m a husband and parent of a nearly-college-aged daughter. For fun, I read, hike East Bay trails, and cook and bake. I’m an individual investor in companies small enough to occasionally talk with management, and a business development intern for one small California company, whose low-flow showerheads reflect the first radical design innovation for that product in over a century.


BAILEY SMITH

Role: Co-founder
Organization: Pop Up Archive
Skills/Specialties: Oral history, audio search via the Pop Up Archive API.
Projects: Pop Up Archive is building a public repository of oral history and public media from around the world, including historic audio from UC Berkeley.
GitHub:
Twitter: @baileyspace
Email: edison@popuparchive.org
Bio: Anne Wootton and I started Pop Up Archive in the Master's program at the Berkeley I School, looking for a way to help radio producers and oral history archivists better preserve and create access to significant digital audio. We've been working with the Public Radio Exchange since 2013 on popuparchive.org, a platform for finding and preserving archival audio, including automatic transcription and keyword tagging. Partners include The Kitchen Sisters, the Pacifica Radio Archives, and WFMT-Chicago's Complete Studs Terkel Digital Archive.


CHRIS HOFFMAN

Role: Manager of Informatics Services
Organization: Research IT (UC Berkeley)
Skills/Specialties:
Projects:
GitHub:
Twitter:
Email: chris.hoffman@berkeley.edu
Bio:


JAKE HARTNELL

Role: Front end developer and product manager
Organization: Hypothes.is
Skills/Specialties: HTML, CSS, JavaScript, CoffeeScript, Python, PHP, XML, various frameworks notably Angular.js, designing, communicating, writing, reading, thinking, and making music.
Projects: @hypothes_is, @FuturePressOrg, @Epubjs
GitHub: RawKStar77
Twitter: @JakeHartnell
Email: JakeHartnell@hypothes.is
Bio: The age of the Internet means it's easier for people to learn about and do many things. Accordingly, I am a writer, musician, artist, intellectual, developer, designer, and entrepreneur. Ask me about web annotation, digital publishing, or the future of libraries!


JULIAN JAFFE

Role: Engineer
Organization: Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology
Skills/Specialties: Full stack, particularly SQL, Django, jQuery & Angular.js although I have at least a passing familiarity with many other technologies & stacks, and experience coding in Python, Java, C, Ruby, Javascript, & Scala. Proficient with Solr and ElasticSearch. I am also very well-versed with both PAHMA's data and the underlying API for the hackathon.
Projects (past & present experiences): Internal PAHMA webapps; rudimentary online DAW for class; interned with the Big Data pod at Marin Software.
GitHub: JulianJaffe
Twitter:
Email: julianjaffe@berkeley.edu
Bio: I am a senior here at Cal with a double major in Computer Science and History. I have worked with PAHMA since June 2013, and recently completed a summer internship with Marin Software. Please don’t hesitate to ask me about anything, whether it's how to programmatically send requests to the API, where to find particular data in the collection (so long as it's available through the API!), or how helpful your idea might be to a researcher. I'll also be helping to run the Piazza page.


LESLIE TOM

Role: Design UX Research
Organization: Kaiser Permanente
Skills/Specialties: Design UX (User Experience), research and design, service design, architecture.
Projects (past & present experiences): @flux.io, @pplanter, CollectionSpace, @foursquare, @readyforzero, @architectureco, @AIANational @PresNation
GitHub: leslietom
Twitter: @les733
Website: leslietom.com
Email: leslie.tom@gmail.com
Bio: I love the intersection between people, places, and (physical/digital) things. I have participated in 5 hackathons in the past few years and love pushing the envelope for effective ways to collaborate,communicate and quickly explore with prototypes.  My current practice is to create journey and experience maps to understand both front and back stage issues informed by UX research methods.  Working with a number of start-ups I'm passionate about brining an understanding of what users need; as form follows function!


PATRICK SCHMITZ

Role: Associate Director
Organization: Research IT (UC Berkeley)
Skills/Specialties:
Projects: CollectionSpace.org, Delphi
GitHub: plschmitz
Twitter: @PSchmitzUC
Email: pschmitz@berkeley.edu
Bio:


RAYMOND YEE

Role: Lecturer
Organization: School of Information
Skills/Specialties: APIs and mashups, working with data, digital humanities, Python programming
Projects: Working with Open Data, a course I teach at the School of Information
GitHub: rdhyee
Twitter: @rdhyee
Email: raymond.yee@gmail.com
Bio: I love to work with people working to unlock meaning from digital repositories.


RICHARD MILLET

Role: Software Engineer
Organization: Research IT (UC Berkeley)
Skills / Specialties: General computer science skills, experience in most strongly typed programming languages, some Python. Lots of server-side programming experience. Modest SQL experience. Modest linux scripting experience. Modest iOS programming skills.
Projects: CollectionSpace.org
GitHub: remillet
Twitter: @remillet
Email: remillet@berkeley.edu
Bio: I’m a member of the Research Information Technology group at UC Berkeley. I have 20+ years of professional programming experience. I’m currently the acting Technical Lead for an open-source Collection Management System called CollectionSpace.org. When not programming computers, I spend time gardening, making bread, barn-raising and enjoying the company of my two daughters, my wife, three chickens, and a feisty Jack Russell Terrier.


Subject Area Mentors

CORRI MACEWEN

Role: Project Manager, Archaeological and Osteological Collections
Organization: Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology
Skills/Specialties: Archaeological Field Methods, Museum Collections Care, Zooarchaeology/Osteology, Oceania, North American Plains and Northwest coast cultures.
Projects: Moving whichever of the 2 milllion objects Natasha doesn’t get around to moving (probably because they are shelved up high or are heavy).
Twitter:
Email: corrimac@berkeley.edu
Bio: As a Canadian, I inadvertently add a high level of class and competency to any situation. For the past three years I have been making the Phoebe Hearst Museum and UC Berkeley classy as we competently prepare the archaeology collections for their classy move. Before this, I replenished my classiness in Canada by competently excavating a coastal village and supervising a classy move of the archaeology collections at the Museum of Anthropology, UBC. Remember that decade when Texas was classy? All me. Eight classy years were spent competently excavating and classily working on my M.A. focusing competently on the classy zooarchaeology of the prehistoric High Plains. So, in short. Competent. Classy. Canadian.


ELIZABETH MINOR

Role: Archaeologist
Organization: Near Eastern Studies, University of California, Berkeley
Skills/Specialties: Egyptian and Sudanese Archaeology, Digital Imaging, Collections and Archives Databases.
Projects: Excavating in northeastern Africa and museum basements (not sure which is dustier!)
Twitter: @Minorstravels
Email: eminor@berkeley.edu
Bio: I fell in love with archaeology when I was a kid from poring over the photographs of Tutankhamun's tomb, and remember touring the Hearst Museum basement with my mom and wanting to know what was in every cabinet. While a graduate student at Cal I got my chance to find out by working on several registration and photography projects for the Reisner Egyptian archaeology collections. Then, as the Hearst Museum Move Photographer, I got a whirlwind tour of the rest of the world as my team imaged tens of thousands of objects from Africa, Oceania and Asia. I excavate in Sudan, Egypt and California—specializing in database design, digital asset management, and advanced imaging techniques. My research looks at the socio-political use of object collection and display in ancient Nubia (Kerma), which greatly informs my approach to the creation of accessible and engaged museum resources for modern audiences.


JORDAN JACOBS

Role: Head of Repatriation and Cultural Policy
Organization: Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology
Skills/Specialties: Cultural Policy, Repatriation (NAGPRA and international), traditional care, provenance research, suppression of the illicit antiquities trade
Projects:
Twitter: @JordanNJacobs
Email: j.jacobs@berkeley.edu
Bio:  I've loved archaeology and museums for as long as I can remember. My childhood interest in mummies, castles and Indiana Jones led to my participation in my first excavation, at age 13, in California's Sierra Nevada. After completing a high school archaeology program in the American Southwest, I followed my passion at Stanford, Oxford, and Cambridge. Since then, my work for the Smithsonian, the American Museum of Natural History, UNESCO Headquarters in Paris, and here at Berkeley has focused on cultural policy, descendent community outreach, and provenance research. I am also the author of the Samantha Sutton series of archaeological adventure books for kids, published by Sourcebooks Jabberwocky.


JUN SUNSERI

Role: Assistant Professor
Organization: Department of Anthropology, UC Berkeley
Skills/Specialties:
Projects:
Twitter:
Email: jsunseri@berkeley.edu
Bio:


JUSTIN UNDERHILL

Role: Post-doctoral researcher
Organization: Digital Humanities, University of Southern California
Skills/Specialties:
Projects:
Twitter:
Email: justinhunderhill@gmail.com
Bio: Justin Harrington Underhill received his Ph.D. in Art History from University of California, Berkeley in December, 2012. His dissertation World Art and the Illumination of Virtual Space uses advanced software to reconstruct the architectural contexts in which works of art were displayed to explore the relation between pictures and the lighting of the space in which they were originally viewed. This digital methodology simulates how pictures appeared long ago and in changing situations of illumination and has allowed Underhill to show how virtuoso artists such as Leonardo da Vinci and Peter Paul Rubens organized their depiction of light for symbolic purposes in relation to their practical understanding of the light that would actually fall on their pictures. His research extends beyond architectural and pictorial assemblages from the Renaissance and the Baroque in Northern and Southern Europe to include ancient Mediterranean and North American worlds. Current projects include reconstructions of the Franciscan missions of Southern California, as well as two monumental house posts erected by the Kwakwaka’wakw (a First Nations group of the Pacific Northwest Coast) in the late nineteenth century. He is also employing acoustic software to analyze the interaction of acoustics and pictures.

Several case studies from his dissertation are forthcoming; the first of these will appear in World Art in Fall 2014.


KENT LIGHTFOOT

Role: Professor
Organization: Department of Anthropology, UC Berkeley
Skills/Specialties:
Projects:
Twitter:
Email: klightfoot@berkeley.edu
Bio: Kent Lightfoot is currently a Professor in the Anthropology Department and Curator of North American Archaeology at the University of California, Berkeley. He joined the Berkeley faculty in 1987. He received his BA from Stanford University and his PhD from Arizona State University. As an archaeologist who has spent the last 30 years working in New England, the American Southwest, and the Pacific Coast of North America, he specializes in the study of coastal hunter-gatherer peoples, culture contact research, and the archaeology of colonialism. His recent archaeological investigations have focused on the Russian Colony of Fort Ross, the shell mounds of the greater San Francisco Bay Area, and indigenous landscape management practices along the central coast of California. Lightfoot's recent publications include Indians, Missionaries, and Merchants: The Legacy of Colonial Encounters on the California Frontiers (2005, UC Press) and California Indians and their Environments: An Introduction (with Otis Parrish) (2009, UC Press).


MARTINA SMITH

Role: Cultural Policy Analyst
Organization: Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology
Skills/Specialties: NAGPRA, North American archaeology, osteology, museum and archival research methods, museum registration and databases
Projects:
Twitter:
Email: msmith28@berkeley.edu
Bio: I became hooked on all things archaeology at a young age. After taking classes in everything from the prehistoric cultures of Central America to linguistic analysis and a brief stint in cultural resource management, I finally found my special purpose. I discovered that no matter who, where, or when, I was always most interested in the material culture. Museums seemed the logical place to direct my passion, and I haven’t looked back since. The majority of my work has been in the Midwest, but I have spent the last three years at the Hearst Museum working with California descendant communities and NAGPRA.


NATASHA JOHNSON

Role: Manager of North American Collections
Organization: Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology
Skills/Specialties: Archaeological and museum methods and practice. Native American history and culture. CollectionSpace end user.
Projects: Moving 2 million objects from here to there, providing access to the collections.
Twitter:
Email: johnsonnl@berkeley.edu
Bio: After playing in the dirt for six years, working as a California archaeologist, I retreated into the basements of museums. For four years I worked as a collections manager at the National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian. For the last nine years I have worked in the same position at the Hearst Museum. In my off time, I like to read Terry Pratchett-esque books, tend my kitchen garden, cook, hold up the end of things during my husband’s various re-modeling projects, ride Space Mountain, and play Halo and Portal—preferably all at once.


PAOLO PELLEGATTI

Role: Archaeologist
Organization: Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology
Skills/Specialties:
Projects:
Twitter:
Email: paolo@berkeley.edu
Bio: I joined the Hearst Museum in 2007 from the UCB Anthropology Department. During my career as archaeologist I worked in Italy, Turkey, Croatia and California, and excavated at more than 25 ancient sites. As a student I was fascinated by stone technology and research, including the microscopic analysis of tool edges to infer their prehistoric use. During my doctoral research I focused on site definition, distribution and specialization, which gave me the opportunity to hike across the Istria Peninsula and visits all its remote corners, from the mountains to the beaches, just like the Paleolithic people would. 


TSIM SCHNEIDER

Role: Post-doctoral fellow
Organization: UC Santa Barbara
Skills/Specialties:
Projects:
Twitter:
Email: tschneider@anth.ucsb.edu
Bio: Tsim Schneider is a citizen of the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria and a University of California President's Postdoctoral Fellow affiliated with the Department of Anthropology at UC Santa Barbara. His doctoral research at UC Berkeley partly involved the analysis of a collection of artifacts housed at the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology, and his continuing work examines the interactions of Native Americans and colonial institutions in the San Francisco Bay.


Target Audience Mentors

ANDRÉ CRAMBLIT

Role: Operations Director
Organization: Northern California Indian Development Center
Skills/Specialties: P–16 education policy and planning
Projects:
Representing: Tribes and heritage communities, K-12 students and educators, Researchers and university education
Twitter:
Email: andrekaruk@ncidc.org
Bio: Ayukîi. Nani aaréek íimshaapaneech. Naa káruk áraara, káru vúra má'su'araara. Naa káru nani'áraaras kah'tim'îin káru uutim'îin nu'aramsîiprivti. Hello. My name is André Cramblit. I am a Karuk Tribal member from the Klamath and Salmon Rivers. I am from the villages of Katimiin (upper falls) and Utimiin (lower falls). I am from a family of Dance Makers. I Dance in the Brush Dance, Flower Dance, War Dance and the Pikiyavish (World Renewal) dance and participated in a Jump Dance to reclaim our Tribal land. I am a traditional storyteller, gambler and singer/drummer.

I graduated in a class of 32 from Hoopa High School on the largest reservation in California. I went from this remote, impoverished, Native American community to Dartmouth College, an elite Ivy League college 2,600 miles away where I received my BA in Education and Sociology. My classmates went from small town traditional Natives to private school privileged individuals such as Michael Rockefeller, the Crown Prince of Ethiopia, and a girl who was given a professional soccer team for her 18th birthday. I learned to exist in two worlds and to balance my values and traditions with the expectations and mores of the dominant society. I used this experience to form the basis of my career and personal goals of using my education to benefit American Indian people, Tribes and communities. I also have a California Clear Teaching Credential from Humboldt State University.

I have been involved in American Indian Education for nearly 30 years at all levels (parent, teacher's aid, bus driver, high school teacher, head start teacher and administrator, college instructor, principal, and tribal education director). I have been the Chair of the Karuk Language Restoration Committee since 1990. I was a founding member of the Native American Caucus of the National Association of Bilingual Education and also a founding member and currently appointed to the California American Indian Education Oversight Committee. I call myself a lottery linguist, meaning if I came into a large sum of money I would quite work and devote myself to the language full time.

I am currently the operations director for the Northern California Indian Development Council).


ELIZABETH MINOR

Role: Archaeologist
Organization: Near Eastern Studies, University of California, Berkeley
Skills/Specialties: Egyptian and Sudanese Archaeology, Digital Imaging, Collections and Archives Databases.
Projects: Excavating in northeastern Africa and museum basements (not sure which is dustier!)
Representing: Researchers and university education
Twitter: @Minorstravels
Email: eminor@berkeley.edu
Bio: I fell in love with archaeology when I was a kid from poring over the photographs of Tutankhamun's tomb, and remember touring the Hearst Museum basement with my mom and wanting to know what was in every cabinet. While a graduate student at Cal I got my chance to find out by working on several registration and photography projects for the Reisner Egyptian archaeology collections. Then, as the Hearst Museum Move Photographer, I got a whirlwind tour of the rest of the world as my team imaged tens of thousands of objects from Africa, Oceania and Asia. I excavate in Sudan, Egypt and California–specializing in database design, digital asset management, and advanced imaging techniques. My research looks at the socio-political use of object collection and display in ancient Nubia (Kerma), which greatly informs my approach to the creation of accessible and engaged museum resources for modern audiences.


JUN SUNSERI

Role: Assistant Professor
Organization: Department of Anthropology, UC Berkeley
Skills/Specialties:
Projects:
Representing: Researchers and university education
Twitter:
Email: jsunseri@berkeley.edu
Bio:


JUSTIN UNDERHILL

Role: Post-doctoral researcher
Organization: Digital Humanities, University of Southern California
Skills/Specialties:
Projects:
Representing: Researchers and university education
Twitter:
Email: justinhunderhill@gmail.com
Bio: Justin Harrington Underhill received his Ph.D. in Art History from University of California, Berkeley in December, 2012. His dissertation World Art and the Illumination of Virtual Space uses advanced software to reconstruct the architectural contexts in which works of art were displayed to explore the relation between pictures and the lighting of the space in which they were originally viewed. This digital methodology simulates how pictures appeared long ago and in changing situations of illumination and has allowed Underhill to show how virtuoso artists such as Leonardo da Vinci and Peter Paul Rubens organized their depiction of light for symbolic purposes in relation to their practical understanding of the light that would actually fall on their pictures. His research extends beyond architectural and pictorial assemblages from the Renaissance and the Baroque in Northern and Southern Europe to include ancient Mediterranean and North American worlds. Current projects include reconstructions of the Franciscan missions of Southern California, as well as two monumental house posts erected by the Kwakwaka’wakw (a First Nations group of the Pacific Northwest Coast) in the late nineteenth century. He is also employing acoustic software to analyze the interaction of acoustics and pictures.

Several case studies from his dissertation are forthcoming; the first of these will appear in World Art in Fall 2014.


JOSEPH EYRES

Role: 5th grade teacher
Organization: Ohlone Elementary School, WCCUSD
Skills/Specialties: Multi-subject educator; technology lead teacher; GATE lead teacher
Projects:
Representing: K-12 students and educators
Twitter: @joe_eyres
Email: jeyres@wccusd.net
Bio: Joseph is a 5th grade teacher at Ohlone Elementary School in Hercules, CA. He has been teaching for eleven years. His favorite subjects are reading, science, and history. Joseph loves inspiring his students to be curious, to research topics, and to make connections in the real world. He has lead activities on campus teaching the use of the atlatl in ancient hunting techniques, marched his students into mock Revolutionary War battles, grown the three sisters in the community garden, and had other exciting experiences. His students have gone on scientific and historical study trips throughout the Bay Area, including Pt. Reyes, Oakland History Museum, UC Berkeley, Cal Academy of Sciences, and the Exploratorium. Lately, Joseph has been integrating more technology into the classroom and will soon roll out a cart of tablets for 1-device-to-1-student education using Google Apps for Education and other apps. He looks forward to working with the Hearst Museum to help create more apps for students and educators!


KENT LIGHTFOOT

Role: Professor
Organization: Department of Anthropology, UC Berkeley
Skills/Specialties:
Projects:
Representing: Researchers and university education
Twitter:
Email: klightfoot@berkeley.edu
Bio: Kent Lightfoot is currently a Professor in the Anthropology Department and Curator of North American Archaeology at the University of California, Berkeley. He joined the Berkeley faculty in 1987. He received his BA from Stanford University and his PhD from Arizona State University. As an archaeologist who has spent the last 30 years working in New England, the American Southwest, and the Pacific Coast of North America, he specializes in the study of coastal hunter-gatherer peoples, culture contact research, and the archaeology of colonialism. His recent archaeological investigations have focused on the Russian Colony of Fort Ross, the shell mounds of the greater San Francisco Bay Area, and indigenous landscape management practices along the central coast of California. Lightfoot's recent publications include Indians, Missionaries, and Merchants: The Legacy of Colonial Encounters on the California Frontiers (2005, UC Press) and California Indians and their Environments: An Introduction (with Otis Parrish) (2009, UC Press).


MARY LOU BILBAO

Role: Sixth grade teacher
Organization: Albany Middle School
Skills/Specialties:
Projects:
Representing: K-12 students and educators
Twitter:
Email: mbilbao@ausdk12.org
Bio:


NICK TIPON

Role: Tribal elder, retired teacher
Organization: Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria
Skills/Specialties:
Projects:
Representing: Tribes and heritage communities, K-12 students and educators
Twitter:
Email: nicktipon@comcast.net
Bio: Nick Tipon is a retired high school teacher and a member of the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria. Nick is a tribal elder and has been a longtime member of the tribe's Sacred Sites Protection Committee. He is also the tribe's National Park Service and NAGPRA Liaison. Nick is a board member of the California Mission Studies Association and currently serves on the Society for California Archaeology's Ethics Committee where he focuses on tribal consultation under CEQA and Section 106 (NHPA) with federal, state and local government agencies to avoid disturbances of, and to protect, the cultural resources of the tribe.


NICOLE LIM

Role: Executive Director
Organization: California Indian Museum and Cultural Center (CIMCC)
Skills/Specialties:
Projects:
Representing: Tribes and heritage communities
Twitter:
Email: NikkiMyers@aol.com
Bio: Nicole Lim is Pomo. She received her Bachelor of Arts Degree from the University of California at Berkeley and a Juris Doctorate from the University of San Francisco, School of Law. She has worked for the National Indian Justice Center and the California Indian Museum and Cultural Center over the past decade. During the summer of 1998 she interned at the U.S. EPA Region IX, Indian Programs Office. She has taught numerous undergraduate courses on Native American Studies at San Francisco, Sonoma and Sacramento State Universities. Ms. Lim is the director of community relations for Naqmayam Communications, an Indian owned and operated public relations firm that handles accounts with tribes, tribal organizations and corporations that seek visibility in Indian Country. Ms. Lim serves as a trainer for NIJC’s regional and on-site training programs in the subject matter of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and its Impact on Justice Systems, Juvenile Delinquency and Gang Violence and Federal Indian Law. She is the executive director of the California Indian Museum and Cultural Center (CIMCC), which seeks to educate the public about California Indian history and cultures from a native perspective. Ms. Lim designs and delivers exhibits and programs that contribute to curricular and education reform, she directs CIMCC programs, including Native Youth in Action and the Pomo Language documentation and reclamation projects. Ms. Lim will only be available to answer questions by email through September 17th. 


RICHARD HUGHES

Role: Archaeologist, geochemist
Organization: Geochemical Research Laboratory
Skills/Specialties:
Projects:
Representing: Researchers and university education
Twitter:
Email: rehughes@silcon.com
Bio: Dr. Richard Hughes founded Geochemical Research Laboratory (GRL) in 1986. His lab specializes in archaeological geochemistry (obsidian sourcing); specifically, the use of energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence (edxrf) spectrometry to determine the selected major, minor, trace, and rare earth element composition of volcanic rocks (predominantly obsidian, dacite, andesite, and basalt), and the use of distinctive combinations of various chemical elements to determine the likely geologic source of origin for archaeological artifacts. Dr. Hughes has conducted edxrf research on tens of thousands of samples for educational institutions, governmental agencies, museums, and private consulting firms. Most of his lab's research has focused on the far western region of North America (Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming) although he's also conducted studies on obsidians found in archaeological contexts in the Great Plains and Midwest, Alaska, Baja California, Canada, Mesoamerica, South America, Tibet, and Iceland. Dr. Hughes has recently undertaken studies of flint from geological and archaeological contexts in Scandinavia (Denmark and Sweden), Lithuania, and Poland.


TSIM SCHNEIDER

Role: Post-doctoral fellow
Organization: UC Santa Barbara
Skills/Specialties:
Projects:
Representing: Tribes and heritage communities, Researchers and university education
Twitter:
Email: tschneider@anth.ucsb.edu
Bio: Tsim Schneider is a citizen of the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria and a University of California President's Postdoctoral Fellow affiliated with the Department of Anthropology at UC Santa Barbara. His doctoral research at UC Berkeley partly involved the analysis of a collection of artifacts housed at the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology, and his continuing work examines the interactions of Native Americans and colonial institutions in the San Francisco Bay.